Tuesday, September 17, 2019
Posted By: Desiree Markewich in Indoor Plants

I know there are many of us out there who would love to take part in the house plant trend, growing bigger every year, but through past failures are feeling discouraged. Here are 8 easy to care for plants that will earn back your confidence, and before you know it you will have your very own indoor jungle! 

We must begin with by far the most uncomplicated 2 plants, both of which are know for being tolerant of very low light and preferring to be watered infrequently. Lest we say these 2 are the plant for you if you struggle with low light or remembering to water.


The Snake Plant / Mother in Law’s Tongue (Sansevieria) most commonly has long, wide blade-like foliage in silvery-blue, deep green or a green with a yellow variegation. You can also find snake plants with rounded, rush like foliage or that grow in a more stacked, or fanned shape. This plant can take some seriously low light, but keep in mind low light doesn’t mean no light. If you can’t easily read a book in the daylight falling on your plant, then this is too low of light. Move a little closer to the window if this is the case.


ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia) has very attractive, shiny, tropical looking foliage. The thick, almost succulent-like leaves are responsible for the low water needs of this plant. It is a very well-behaved house plant that will reward you with many new leaves through out the season, even when placed in lower light situations. 


Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema) is another plant tolerant of lower light and drying out between watering. Foliage of this beautiful indoor plant is available in many patterns and colours and can often be found in larger sizes. These larger plants are a great floor plant and look particularly stunning in a basket or in a container with a decorative stand.


Rubber Plant (Ficus elastica) is a lesser talked about relative to the very popular fiddle leaf fig tree but is much more forgiving in care. It will perform better in a higher light condition than our former 3 plants, preferring bright indirect sun. For watering, water regularly, not letting soil completely dry out between watering.


Pothos (Epipremnum) and our next plant are both good options if you are tight on floor space and want a hanging plant or something to put on a shelf that will do ‘down’ and not ‘up.’ Because of its easy nature this is a plant you often see in shopping malls or offices. If you notice your plant stretching or producing smaller foliage than pervious, you may want to move it into spot with more light. 


Heart Leaf Philodendron (Philodendron hederaceum) has a much similar appearance to Pothos but is a little more tolerant of lower light and you will experience less of a reaction with underwatering. The only thing to keep in mind with both the Philodendron and the Pothos is over watering. Both plants can be prone to root rot, so if they are in a lower light condition make sure you are not watering more frequently than the plant can use it up. Think less light equals less photosynthesis taking place, therefore your plants will use less water. Little to no water leaves the soil through evaporation.


Air Plants (Tillandsia) are a unique plant that grows without the presence of soil. Due to this you can get creative with how you display them, using them as a living kind of art. For care they require bright, indirect light and a10-15 min soak in water every 1-2 weeks. For more care tips see our Air Plant care page!


Cactus are the ultimate low water, easy care house plant. All they ask is that you provide them with a bright sunny spot, this means receiving at least 6-8 hours of sun per day. The other important thing to know when it comes to cacti is to ease up completely on watering during the winter months. Many cacti go into dormancy during winter, requiring little to no water until spring comes again. 

I hope you have learned a few things and feel inspired to try one of these rewarding plants. Be assured that no matter how much experience we have, there are always new things for us to discover and mistakes to be made and that sometimes the best way to learn is through our experiences of defeat, so don’t be discouraged if you lose a plant. It just means you can try another!
 

Sunday, September 15, 2019
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Ferns


This fall (2019) we've managed to source a variety of unique, unusual and hard to find ferns for the discerning collector or houseplant maven. Most of these are not hardy in our climate and must be brought indoors before any chance of frost occurs. Enjoy!

 

Golden Zebra Fern

Golden Zebra Fern / Striped Bamboo Fern

Coniogramme emeiensis ‘Golden Zebra'

This striking indoor fern features narrow dark green leaflets with lime green stripes. Great in containers. Hardy in warmer climates, but best over wintered indoors (Hardiness Zones 7-9). Can be grown in full to part shade. Reaches a height of 18 in and spreads to 24 in.
 

Birds Nest Fern

Birds Nest Fern

Asplenium nidus

This attractive fern is usually grown for its foliage. Upright, vase shaped fern is evergreen in warm climates (Hardiness 9-11). Foliage is solid, wavy and apple green in colour. Vague resemblance to a birds nest. This fern adds form and substance to summer gardens, terrariums or as a houseplant. Water regularly. Protect from frost! Best grown in part shade. Can reach 5ft by 3ft in size!
 

Silver Ribbon Fern

Silver Ribbon Fern

Petris cretica ‘Albolineata’

This attention-grabbing fern features arching pale green fronds with white central patches. Slow growing. Likes high humidity in full to part shade. Great for summer containers or indoors. Bring inside before frost!
 

Heart Fern

Heart Fern

Hemionitis arifolia

This tropical fern forms tufts of evergreen glossy green heart shaped fronds on black stems. Fertile fronds with arrowhead-shaped leaves stand above the foliage. Bring inside before frost (Hardiness zones 10-11). Prefers shade to part shade in neutral to acidic, rich organic soils. Can grow 10 inches in height and 12 inches spread.
 

Staghorn Fern

Netherlands Staghorn Fern

Platycerium bifurcatum ‘Netherlands’

This pre-historic looking fern features pale green broad fronds and forked tips. Evergreen in warm climates and epiphytic. Good for mounting! Mount on trees, a board, walls or in a moss hanging basket. Avoid drying out! Popularly sold as a house plant, if displayed outdoors bring in before frost (Hardiness 9-11). Best grown in part shade. Can reach 2ft high and 3ft across!

Tasmanian Tree Fern

Tasmanian Tree Fern

Dicksonia Antarctica

This slow growing tree fern displays arching bright green fronds in a full head. Trunk is covered with reddish-brown hairs. Ideal for shady borders, accent plantings and along walkways. Prefers moist, well-drained soil with consistent water during hot weather. Can reach 16ft tall and 12ft spread in warm climates. Should be brought inside in our climate (Hardiness 9-11). Shade to part shade.
 

Brazilian Tree Fern

Brazilian Tree Fern

Blechnum Brasiliense

 

This upright evergreen fern displays finely textured arching fronds. New fronds emerge reddish-bronze. Forms a small trunk with age. Protect from frost (Hardiness 9-11). Thrives in neutral to acidic loose, rich, organic soil. Keep soil evenly moist. Shade to part shade. Can reach 3ft by 3ft in size
 

Licorice Fern

Licorice Fern

Polypodium glycyrrhiza

This somewhat hardy fern (Hardiness 6-9) is a popular foliage plant for indoors or out. Mounded fronds can reach 8-12 inches in height. Excellent in landscapes or containers. Best grown in shade to part shade
 

Silver Lady Fern

Silver Lady Fern

Blechnum gibbum ‘Silver Lady’

This evergreen fern develops a trunk with maturity. Gives the appearance of a tree fern, but at a much smaller size. Can reach 36-48 inches in height and 24-36 inches spread. Best in shade to part shade. Protect from frost (Hardiness 10-11).

As always our selection and pricing is constantly changing and can vary from week to week. Please call ahead to confirm availability if you are making a special trip to acquire these beautiful ferns.


Thursday, September 12, 2019
Posted By: Marian Vaughan in Pollinators

The days are unmistakably shortening. We are heading breakneck towards the equinox (Sept. 23), and after that, we embark upon the triumph of the night and the days begin to shorten.


In the meantime, our gardens are alive with bees, hummingbirds and even a few butterflies. There are still many annuals & tender perennials to keep them fed, all the various daisies that brighten the garden: cosmos, tender fuchsias, tender sage & geraniums keep them coming back for more.


Bees

Kept fairly happy with Albizzia, Buddleia (Butterfly Bush) & aromatic herbs such as Perovskia (Russian Sage), Limonium (Sea Lavender) & the second blooming of Lavender & Centranthus. I notice them haunting the roses as well, especially the single ones, as do the butterflies.


Butterflies

Adult butterflies are dwindling, but they & their descendants need our help more than ever. Somewhere there has arisen a mania for “Fall cleanup” of perennials in the garden. This is a horticultural disaster, since you are encouraging the frost to kill the perennial growth you want to keep by exposing the tender new growth and removing their refuge from the cold. By cleaning up you also eliminate host plants for chrysalises of butterflies and shelter for pollinators.

If we leave the garden be until spring, we can expect them in greater numbers. Even if leaving your whole garden doesn’t appeal to you, for visual reasons, leaving just a small area can go a long way in helping pollinators.


Hummingbirds

The Rufous hummingbirds have fled South, but we now have over-wintering Anna’s who have followed the feeders North as the climate warms. This time of year begins the season of their real need for our care. There is still food for them: Fuchsias, both hardy & tender, Petunias, red Salvia and a smattering of other plants; But feeders fill the gap as the flowers fade. 


If you like to feed hummingbirds, be aware this is no light commitment. These little birds need feeding in the dead of winter too, at the crack of dawn, from feeders free of snow and ice. We will have more on this later, several of us can show our bare footprints in the snow; But for the moment it is just time to be aware of changing needs.

Although not technically pollinators, native birds: juncos, chickadees, nuthatches & towhees also bring life to the fading garden. These birds greatly need shelter & warmth from now on into winter. The method of leaving the garden be in fall provides this and as a bonus, the birds do their own ‘weeding’: collecting weed seeds from under the canopy.


Although it can seem depressing as the days begin to close in, September is historically a time of preservation of summer’s bounty; a time to nurture all we care for, so that we all emerge triumphantly into the new year to come.
 

Thursday, September 12, 2019
Posted By: Marian Vaughan in Bulbs

In the fall, we are cheered by the arrival of bulbs that promise spring again soon. I have not the smallest wish to diminish that candle: it is the fire that warms gardeners through


These bulbs rekindle spring in the garden almost as soon as they are planted: the fall crocuses, the colchicum, winter cyclamen. They are here so briefly, yet planted early (Run, don’t walk) they spread to form admirable clumps in a garden fast fading. Cyclamen & Colchicum are particularly desirable for the beautiful foliage they contribute in spring, but the Fall Crocus: Saffron, Zonatus & others are bee magnets and there is something particularly wonderful about encountering these gold hearted beauties on a day you know to be shorter than the one before.


The entry of snow/spring crocus onto the scene assures us the year has begun. The valiant blooming of fall crocus in the darkening year gives us confidence that the year will turn again. Is there ONE amongst us who couldn’t use a bit more confidence? Autumn bulbs, I say to you. Autumn bulbs.


Fall is also the only time we can buy some quite rare bulbs as bulbs/ dried roots. Chief amongst these are Eremerus (Foxtail Lily). These perennials form tall clusters of blooms in warm colours during early summer. Bought as plants later in the year, they are far too expensive to group, yet it is in groups they are most impressive, though they disappear after blooming. Their massive blooms make for a dramatic cut flower.

They are dear to my heart because of an early miscommunication with my husband which has led them to be renamed with us: 
 

“Oh,” said I “ I’d like to plant these, they grow 7-8 feet tall”

“78 feet tall?” he (incredulous)

“Oh yes” me, mishearing in my turn.

“In ONE season?

“Mmhmm”

“Well, we HAVE to get those!!!”

We soon got it sorted, but ever since, they are known as the 78 foot candles and have warmed the sunny part of all our gardens.



Saturday, August 24, 2019
Posted By: Marian Vaughan in Trees

​​​Hungry for spring, we so often choose our trees: cherries, deciduous magnolias, dogwoods, stewartia based on the show they put on at that time. Or we choose fall colour or winter bark. These are all good choices, but today I just want to make a special plea for two truly great trees, Albizia and Magnolia grandiflora.


Walking through the nursery today, I stopped briefly to smell the huge flower of a Magnolia grandiflora sitting at a convenient nose height. Imagine my surprise to find the entire chalice (I assure you there is no better word) packed with bees.


In my own front garden a large Albizia spreads its dappled shade thirty feet high and wide. It is too high for me to notice bees, but butterflies & hummingbirds congregate there all summer.
 


The Albizia needs full sun & good drainage to thrive, but in those conditions, provides the filtered shade most perfect for a patio, or a fishpond. Holds a very tropical appearance — hence the common name mimosa or silk tree. There is now a smaller version 'Summer Chocolate' with foliage that deepens to near chocolate in the summer, adding a wonderful contrast to the rosy pink flowers.


The Magnolia blooms best in full sun, but, preferring more shelter, will still bloom well in a little shade. It is evergreen, unlike the Albizia, & the foliage is extremely handsome, making it a fantastic anchor plant in a garden. It too looks tropical but in a different way, having a fuzzy brown reverse to the leaves which has earned it the common name 'Teddy-Bear Magnolia'.

Both of these deliciously fragrant, long blooming beauties contribute in their own way to the garden. Bringing an exotic element to your space that adds a great deal of ambience and romance.



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Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

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Recent Posts

Tuesday, September 17, 2019
8 Easy Care House Plants You’ll Love

I know there are many of us out there who would love to take part in the house plant trend, growing ...

Sunday, September 15, 2019
9 Rare and Unusual Tropical Ferns

This fall (2019) we've managed to source a variety of unique, unusual and hard to find tropical fern...

Thursday, September 12, 2019
September in the Pollinator Garden

The days are unmistakably shortening. We are heading breakneck towards the equinox (Sept. 23), and a...

Thursday, September 12, 2019
Now is the Time to be Alert for Fall Bulbs

In the fall, we are cheered by the arrival of bulbs that promise spring again soon. I have not the s...

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Tree Queens of Summer

​​​Hungry for spring, we so often choose our trees: cherries, deciduous magnolias, dogwoods, stewart...

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Vegetarian Garlic Broth

Roses love it, vampires fear it. I have a cushion that advises: anyone who doesn't love cats must ha...

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Golden Beet Borscht

As the end of August approaches we strive to make the most of the warm days we have left in the gard...

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Macrophylla Hydrangeas: In with the New!

Without doubt, macrophylla hydrangeas are very high on any list of most popular summer & fall shrubs...


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